Large intestine

Beginning on the right side of the abdomen, the large intestine is connected to the ilium of the small intestine via the ileocecal sphincter. The inferior region of the large intestine forms a short dead-end segment known as the cecum that terminates in the vermiform appendix. The superior region forms a hollow tube known as the ascending colon that climbs along the right side of the abdomen. Just inferior to the diaphragm, the ascending colon turns about 90 degrees toward the middle of the body at the hepatic flexure and continues across the abdomen as the transverse colon.

Large intestine

When you're finished, you take a Large intestine drink of milk, wipe your mouth, and head to your next class. In a few minutes you're thinking about the capital of Oregon or your science fair project. You've completely forgotten about that pizza lunch you just ate.

But it's still in your stomach — sort of like a science experiment that happens all the time! And the digestive system will be Large intestine at work on your chewed-up lunch for the next few hours — or sometimes days, depending upon what you've eaten.

This process, called digestion, allows your body to get the nutrients and energy it needs from the food you eat. So let's find out what's happening to that pizza, orange, and milk.

What Are the Intestines?

Even before you eat, when you smell a tasty food, see it, or think about it, digestion begins. When you do eat, the saliva breaks down the chemicals in the food a bit, which helps make the food mushy and easy to swallow. Your tongue helps out, pushing the food around while you chew with your teeth.

When you're ready to swallow, the tongue pushes a tiny bit of mushed-up food called a bolus say: BO-luss toward the back of your throat and into the opening of your esophagus, the second part of the digestive tract.

On the Way Down The esophagus say: It moves food from the back of your throat to your stomach.

But also at the back of your throat is your windpipe, which allows air to come in and out of your body. When you swallow a small ball of mushed-up food or liquids, a special flap called the epiglottis say: If you've ever drunk something too fast, started to cough, and heard someone say that your drink "went down the wrong way," the person meant that it went down your windpipe by mistake.

This happens when the epiglottis doesn't have enough time to flop down, and you cough involuntarily without thinking about it to clear your windpipe. Once food has entered the esophagus, it doesn't just drop right into your stomach.

Instead, muscles in the walls of the esophagus move in a wavy way to slowly squeeze the food through the esophagus. This takes about 2 or 3 seconds. See You in the Stomach Your stomach, which is attached to the end of the esophagus, is a stretchy sack shaped like the letter J.

It has three important jobs: It does this with help from the strong muscles in the walls of the stomach and gastric say: GAS-trik juices that also come from the stomach's walls.

Large intestine

In addition to breaking down food, gastric juices also help kill bacteria that might be in the eaten food. Onward to the small intestine!

If you stretched out an adult's small intestine, it would be about 22 feet long 6. The small intestine breaks down the food mixture even more so your body can absorb all the vitamins, minerals, proteins, carbohydratesand fats. PAN-kree-ussliver, and gallbladder.

Those organs send different juices to the first part of the small intestine. These juices help to digest food and allow the body to absorb nutrients.

Large intestine

The pancreas makes juices that help the body digest fats and protein. A juice from the liver called bile helps to absorb fats into the bloodstream.

And the gallbladder serves as a warehouse for bile, storing it until the body needs it.FODMAP sounds like some strange kind of geographical tool, but as those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) almost certainly know, the word refers to types of carbohydrates that are poorly absorbed by the small intestine.

FODMAP sounds like some strange kind of geographical tool, but as those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) almost certainly know, the word refers to types of carbohydrates that are poorly absorbed by the small intestine. The large intestine is the final section of the gastrointestinal tract that performs the vital task of absorbing water and vitamins while converting digested food into feces.

Reader's testimonial. I was suffering while following my gastroenterologist's advice. He had me taking fiber supplements, and laxatives and still I was having a lot of bloating, pain, constipation and diarrhea.

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